tvnovellas.info History ITS PERFECTLY NORMAL BOOK

ITS PERFECTLY NORMAL BOOK

Saturday, August 24, 2019 admin Comments(0)

It's Perfectly Normal book. Read reviews from the world's largest community for readers. Alternately playful and realistic, Emberley's art re. It's Perfectly Normal, a year-old illustrated sex-ed book for kids, is meant to teach children about sexual health, puberty and relationships. Book Description Reviews and Praise Look at this Book. IT'S PERFECTLY NORMAL. Changing Bodies, Growing Up, Sex and Sexual Health. 20th Anniversary.


Author:GARFIELD GIROLAMO
Language:English, Spanish, Portuguese
Country:Egypt
Genre:Academic & Education
Pages:515
Published (Last):12.10.2015
ISBN:868-6-42528-707-9
ePub File Size:15.84 MB
PDF File Size:19.40 MB
Distribution:Free* [*Sign up for free]
Downloads:34016
Uploaded by: DARCI

An updated, fifteenth anniversary edition of the definitive book on kids’ sexual health brings this trusted resource into the twenty-first century. Robie H. Harris has written many award-winning books for children of all ages, including the definitive Family Library about. Book for Girls: Revised Edition by Lynda Madaras Paperback $ In Stock. It's Perfectly Normal: A Book about Changing Bodies, Growing Up, Robie H.;. It's Perfectly Normal: Changing Bodies, Growing Up, Sex, and Sexual Health is a children's book about going through puberty. It is written by Robie Harris and.

I had never intended to write a book on this topic, but I had an immediate response. I told him that kids and teens did need to know about the virus, but that they also needed to know a lot of other things about their changing bodies, growing up, sex, and sexual health in order to stay healthy. That night at supper, I told my family about my idea for this book and asked my husband and children what should be in a book on sexual health for kids 10 and up. My children were in high school at the time. And that started my research, which continued over the five years it took to complete this book. While writing the book, I went back to these people over and over again, to make sure my facts were accurate and up-to-date and that the text was age-appropriate.

I'd be very comfortable using this with my 7th and 8th graders, even though the tone and cute illustrations are geared slightly younger-- to 10 and 11 year olds. And the quality and clarity of the information is such that I'd happily use it with my th graders. The one gap? No distinction is made between "sex" and "gender"-- terms which in the 20 years since the first publication of this book we as a society have come to understand in a more nuanced way.

But considering that other books are entirely cis-gendered and heterosexual, this one is at least pointing in the right direction. Dec 11, Dena rated it liked it. This book is a guide for parents to open a dialogue with their child about sex. It covers subjects such as sexual activity, birth control, gender issues, body parts, and puberty. Personal Reaction: Why is this a book that so many feel should be banned in most Summary: Why is this a book that so many feel should be banned in most libraries?

With the number of teenage pregnancies in this state and in the counties in which I work and reside this is a book that should be required reading in the fourth or fifth grades. This work is an honest and open look at sex. Children have questions, and children need answers that are direct and honest.

I believe that one of the reasons children become so confused about sexual activity and their own sexual identity is because parents are not honest with their children.

If a parent needs help talking to their child, this is the book. If a child is not getting the answers they need from their parents, this is the book. Of course sex is an area that no parent feels comfortable discussing with their child, but honesty and information is key in preparing a child to grow into a sexually informed and responsible adult.

Classroom Extension: Rather than reading the entire book to the class, I would have students anonymously submit questions that they need to have answered, either out of their own curiosity or because they are afraid to approach their parents. Then, I would use the text to answer each question.

Mar 07, Robert Beveridge rated it really liked it Shelves: Robie H. Harris, It's Perfectly Normal: Sure, they had funny illustrations and got the point across, but information was the order of the day, and it was all designed to let you know that all those changes your body was going through were normal. You weren't alone.

Robie Harris' controversial, but very entertaining, It's Perfectly Normal has the same message, but the tone is entirely different. This is inclusive and welcoming, with much of the interest coming from a couple of straight men a bird and a bee, appropriately who wander through the book making wisecracks at each other's expense.

Normal its book perfectly

They're worth the price of admission alone. One you get past that, this is your basic sex ed for kids manual, and it reads much the same as the ones I had back in the day. The illustrations are funny without being demeaning, the text is about as age-appropriate as you can get considering the subject, and it's done a great job of angering all the groups one would expect to be angered by a book of this stripe; how much more can you ask? Feb 08, Jess rated it really liked it Shelves: A condensed look at sexual education that looks at so much and answers questions all teens and tweens ask at this time in their life.

Plus it's a frequently banned book so I just HAD to read it. As a librarian, a rule of thumb is when asked. Please read first as a parent and then decided base on A condensed look at sexual education that looks at so much and answers questions all teens and tweens ask at this time in their life. Please read first as a parent and then decided base on your child, your feelings and your lifestyle what you want to discuss. Read the book with your child so you can talk about the subject that come up.

And yes I agree that you might not want to talk about everything in the book. That's why it's in the beginning of the book Let your child know that this is a book that you and them look at together. Not alone were they might be come confused, or more than likely, just make immature comments and opinions about what they see and read.

The illustration are well done.

Yes at time I thought to myself they were very cartoon-ish, but I guess when it comes to illustration the naked body in adolescences, rather stick to cute than go more realistic and become borderline offensive and awkward Dec 28, Duane rated it it was amazing.

This is the best book to give anyone who is suffering the times of change that most adolescents go through. Filled with great illustrations and real-world information, this book holds nothing back. Is it too graphic? I don't think so. Is it too much for younger kids? You bet it is, but for those who are entering puberty and past, this book should be in their hands immediately.

It’s Perfectly Normal

Every library should have this book in their collection to help youngsters understand their bodies. And personally, if y This is the best book to give anyone who is suffering the times of change that most adolescents go through. And personally, if you find this book too liberal or graphic, you scare me. Jan 12, Yiota Misiou rated it really liked it. Harris and Emberley also detail different perspectives on families and offer health advice.

In fact, older students may feel patronized by the simplicity of the text. Illustrations of a bird and a bee, along with their dialogue appear though out the book. The other illustrations are cartoonish, but do portray a multitude a varying body types. The diagrams are accurate and not too hand drawn looking to detract from their informative nature.

Each major part then has various subsections within. The authors not only describe the physical changes one goes through during puberty, but also delves into the emotional aspects. It is not a term most younger readers would really be able to relate to one would hope , and would require further explanation.

Despite the controversy, it is a book I would put in my library. Mar 16, Vanessa rated it really liked it. This is a very concise, well-written book with accurate but non-threatening illustrations for the pre-adolescent set. However, I held this one back for a couple of years, thinking that my son wasn't quite ready for all of the information in it at the age of nine, and that the Usborne book was perfectly pitched at him.

Alas, I think I waited a little too long. My boy had some questions recently that were addressed more fully i This is a very concise, well-written book with accurate but non-threatening illustrations for the pre-adolescent set.

My boy had some questions recently that were addressed more fully in this book, but as a twelve-yr-old he now found the book and its illustrations a bit "kiddy-ish" and worth poking fun at. Penis penis penis! Vagina vagina! Pubic hair! Jul 04, Beth Cato rated it really liked it Shelves: I can see why this book may be deemed "offensive" by some.

It is very blunt in how it addresses sexuality. There are many drawings of naked people of all ages and shapes and races; I don't see this as a bad thing, though. Everything builds towards the message of the very title of the book--it's perfectly normal to have a body with these parts, and have them do certain things, or to have intense dreams with bodily responses, etc.

This is intended for a middle grade audience, and offers a simply-s I can see why this book may be deemed "offensive" by some.

This is intended for a middle grade audience, and offers a simply-stated approach to try to alleviate kids' fears. Even when the artwork shows people straddling each other, it's the kind of thing you'll see on midday TV these days, only this book introduces information about sexual consequences like STD and pregnancy, too.

I see It's Perfectly Normal as a good starting point for an honest conversation where a family can then discuss their beliefs and answer questions. This book was certainly more informative and honest than the sex ed course I took back in high school which came too late for a lot of kids, anyway. Jan 01, Rachel rated it it was amazing. I would go more in depth about gender and sexuality in simple terms, of course as well as more recent findings and why things are controversies in the world.

There would definitely also have to be a discussion about how much of what they have learned about sexuality is shared with their peers from them - it must be clear that those discussions are had between you and someone you trust and some people are unaware of sexuality and it may frighten them to hear it from a classmate or friend. This book has really great information, the newest edition includes bisexuality, talks about abortion rights and contraception and has really thorough but not graphic illustrations cartoons.

There were a few things I didn't like: Sometimes the three-column text format and spliting the chapters without moveing to a new page made the flow of reading a little awkward. The gender discussion does not include transgendered individuals and instead says the male and female are genders. The terms "feeli This book has really great information, the newest edition includes bisexuality, talks about abortion rights and contraception and has really thorough but not graphic illustrations cartoons.

The terms "feeling sexy" and "sexy feelings" get thrown around a lot and no one talks like that, I found it distracting. Nov 25, Anne rated it liked it. This book has a lot of information. It is written in a way that preteens and teens would understand. While many of the pictures are a bit graphic and embarrassing, most are either funny or helpful for those that are more visual.

Perfectly normal book its

Otherwise a post it could be used to block out the images you don't care to look at. This is definitely a book I could have used when I was younger. Many of my questions would have been answered and I wouldn't have had to rely on learning so much from my friends in high This book has a lot of information. Many of my questions would have been answered and I wouldn't have had to rely on learning so much from my friends in high school - since I certainly didn't learn much from "family life" in my Catholic schooling.

There were, however, a few words I felt were missing from the book - virgin, marriage, and monogamy. I also felt the word "sexy" was overused. It is primarily written scientifically so any personal beliefs and feelings would have to be discussed with your child.

I read it for myself before my 5th grade daughter learns about this in school. Still deciding if I will get it for her to read or not. Feb 20, William Andrews marked it as to-read. Allowing trash like this book in American schools points a finger at the precipitous drop in the effectiveness of our churches teaching of the precepts of the Bible in America; eg. Where Homosexuality specifically is called a sin. The overwhelming acceptance of this carnal book is the disappointing message to the Christian community and esp to our Heavenly Father.

What a shame! This book is on the bibliography of books challenged, restricted, removed or banned in put out by Robert P. Doyle and the American Library Association. More info at http: Nov 23, Jeff Youngstrom added it Shelves: My review from April 25, Sep 13, Erica rated it really liked it Shelves: Michael Emberley Illustrator Publication Date: Back to TopBack to Top School Library Journal December 01, ; Gr A wonderful guide for young adolescents setting sail on the stormy seas of puberty.

Frank yet playful, they portray a reassuring array of body types and ethnic groups and illuminate the richly informative, yet compact text, allowing readers to come away with a healthy respect for their bodies and a better understanding of the role that sexuality plays in the human experience.

It’s Perfectly Normal » Robie H. Harris, Children's Book Author

Birth control, abortion, and homosexuality are given an honest, evenhanded treatment, noting differing views and recommending further discussion with a trusted adult.

The dangers of STDs, teen parenthood, and sexual abuse are examined. The inventive use of a bird and a bee that react to the topics throughout artfully contrasts the differing views of early and late bloomers. Like any book that depicts naked bodies and sexual activity, this one is sure to inspire a few giggles in the stacks and be likely to disappear.

But what it offers in scope, currency, and a cheerfully engaging format is quite special. This caring, conscientious, and well-crafted book will be a fine library resource as well as a marvelous adjunct to the middle-school sex-education curriculum. There's no doubt, however, that some libraries and schools will have problems with Emberley's plentiful pictures, which, besides being warm and unaffected, are eyepoppers--especially in a book for this age group.

The bold color cartoon drawings are very candid: Less controversial will be Emberley's helpful diagrams and the running cartoon commentary he supplies on the main text, which is delivered by an embarrassed bee and a curious bird modern kids may miss the allusion, and the device eventually wears thin.

Harris' text, as forthright as Emberley's art, encompasses all the supposedly "age appropriate" issues the structure of the reproductive system and puberty, for example , as well as a good deal more--from the terms we use when we talk about sex to intercourse, birth, abortion, sexual health, abuse, and issues of responsibility and respect. Readers won't find answers to their burning questions quite as easily here as they will in the at-a-glance question-answer overview Asking about Sex and Growing Up , by Joanna Cole.

Harris' coverage, however, is much broader and a good deal more detailed. With illustrations scattered liberally across the pages, the format occasionally seems crowded, but the candor of the artwork will help kids view sex as a natural part of life.

Such openness will also help them grasp the main message of the text: Children will find this a comforting, informative precursor to Lynda Madaras' books on puberty; librarians will find it well worth fighting for if, by some chance, the need arises.

But there's more information than polemic here, as the reader is guided by a corny but never condescending pair--an uninhibited bird and a repressed bee--through puberty, anatomy, reproduction, and a sense of the emotional weight that accompanies sexuality. The book intelligently covers birth-control options, how to have safer sex, how to treat STDs, and, in an especially impressive chapter, how to combat sexual abuse--all without patronizing the pre- or post-pubescent. Emberley's illustrations are often as funny as they are informative.

But for parents who fear that a school sex-ed class may not be informative enough, it will certainly aid that dreaded birds-and-bees discussion. A terrific teaching tool that just may help slow the spread of sexual diseases and ignorance. Taking a conversational, relaxed tone, Harris also discusses such subjects as sexual orientation, sexual reproduction, pregnancy, birth control, sexually transmitted diseases and sexual abuse.

It May Be 'Perfectly Normal', But It's Also Frequently Banned

The author intentionally and effectively repeats certain crucial information, especially on the subject of the possible consequences of sexual intercourse. Appearing on each spread are two characters--an easy-going bird and an apprehensive bee--whose comments add levity to this solid volume.

Ages Sep 29, Ivy rated it it was amazing Shelves: Wanted to read this before giving it to my 13 year old daughter. I really appreciated the fact it has information on birth control, reporting sexual abuse, and staying safe on the internet.

It also contains information on heterosexual, homosexual, and bisexual relationships that is free from judgment. I will admit a few of the excellent illustrations made my eyebrows go up to the top of my Wanted to read this before giving it to my 13 year old daughter. As the title states, Its Perfectly Normal. Feb 18, Xenophon Hendrix rated it it was amazing. I read through this to remind myself, for some fiction I've been working on, what today's sixth grader generally knows about sexuality.

All things considered, I believe the book is excellent. I caught one mistake that might have been fixed in a later edition: Human beings have about 20, genes, not a , Other than that, it is accurate to the limits of my knowledge. Any quibbles I have with the book are on emphasis rather than facts.

The illustrations all drawn are clear and useful. Ther I read through this to remind myself, for some fiction I've been working on, what today's sixth grader generally knows about sexuality. There is a lot of nudity, but given the subject matter, I believe it is appropriate.

The writing is straightforward and simple without being simplistic. New terms are defined. The reader is never talked down to. Considering the target age range, the information is comprehensive. Note well that I'm not a parent myself.

In my opinion, the author takes pains not to undermine parental authority. She presents all sides of controversial issues, while not dodging any of them, and frequently reminds the reader that it's best to discuss things with a trusted adult.

For the most part, she keeps her personal value judgments to herself. The book bills itself as being for children ten years old and up. I can see a ten-year-old reading it, if the child receives sensitive adult support at the same time.

It's Perfectly Normal: A Book about Changing Bodies, Growing Up, Sex, and Sexual Health

I really wish that I'd had this book when I was a year older at age eleven, though. After an alarming incident I won't go into, I was forced to figure things out for myself.

I didn't trust my parents not to humiliate me. I used a collegiate dictionary and an encyclopedia to get my information. Fortunately, I was an advanced reader at that age. Not every kid is so lucky. I give the book my highest recommendation. Dec 08, Steve Tetreault rated it liked it Shelves: The following response is from the class for which I read this book: But I think it would be an excellent resource for kids about to start, or beginning, puberty.

Feb 03, Kate rated it liked it Recommends it for: Replete with colorful, anatomically correct drawings on every page, this non-fiction book guides young people entering adolescence through the physical and emotional changes they may have begun experiencing already or will be soon.

The author covers a very wide array of topics, including anatomy, hormones, sexual orientation, sexual development, the ins and outs of puberty, hygiene, conception, pregnancy, birth, intercourse, birth control, AIDS and other STDs, sexual abuse and even I Annotation: The author covers a very wide array of topics, including anatomy, hormones, sexual orientation, sexual development, the ins and outs of puberty, hygiene, conception, pregnancy, birth, intercourse, birth control, AIDS and other STDs, sexual abuse and even Internet safety.

In order to properly appreciate and evaluate this book, I tried to go back and put myself into the mindset of its intended preteen audience.

Would I read this book? What would I think of it? Would I like it? Would I find it helpful and informative? Harris suggests several times that the reader talk to a family member about his or her own puberty and ask any questions that he or she may have, which is always good advice, but easier said than done.

I certainly never did so, and while I may not have opted to read this book from cover to cover or in public, I certainly would have looked through it in the privacy of my own bedroom and sated my curiosity.

I found the language appropriate to the age level and reassuring in tone. The origins of the many Latin-based words, such as puberty and menstruation, are explained, and complicated processes, such as ovulation and conception, are broken down step-by-step and illustrated, and I never felt that Harris talked down to the reader.

You might also like: API 2000 7TH EDITION PDF

Even beyond the information, I appreciate the diversity of the illustrations. All kinds of people, in every size and shape imaginable, appear in the most ordinary ways. It too is wonderful, although fewer parents will find themselves reading it side by side with curious children. Someone may disagree with what I wrote. This is what this author wrote. This is what your friends may believe. I thought it was interesting.

Harris suggests. Others will take the book. Some will pretend not to be interested.