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THE ULTIMATE HISTORY OF VIDEO GAMES PDF

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The Ultimate History of Video Games reveals everything you ever wanted to know and more about the unforgettable games that changed the world. [BEST BOOKS] Ultimate History Video Games by Steven Kent Free Acces pdf download [BEST BOOKS] Ultimate History Video Games by. Download Citation on ResearchGate | The Ultimate History of Video Games | Review of The Ultimate History of Video Games / Kent, Steven L. The Ultimate.


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games industry, The Ultimate History of Video Games tells it as it is. . The ultimate history ofvideo games: from Pong to Pokemon-the story behind the craze . The Ultimate History of Video Games. From Pong to Pokemon and Beyond—. The Story Behind the Craze That Touched Our Lives and Changed the World. Inside the Games You Grew Up with but Never Forgot With all the whiz, bang, pop, and shimmer of a glowing arcade. The Ultimate History of Video Games.

You may improve this article , discuss the issue on the talk page , or create a new article , as appropriate. January Learn how and when to remove this template message Although the exact years differ, all timelines overlap in the early s. Technology journalist Jason Whittaker, in The Cyberspace Handbook, places the beginning of the golden age in , with the release of Space Invaders. However, was the period that began "a fairly steady decline" in the coin-operated video game business and when many arcades started disappearing. The game brought forth with it the power of the microprocessor, as well as a cult phenomenon impact which had only been felt up to that point by Atari's Pong.

I know some people must think "corporate history? Kent does a great job discussing the personalities associated with the major video game companies throughout history. I This book intrigued me and I actually enjoyed it a lot more than I thought I would. I almost wish there was a movie about the fall of Atari and the Rise of Nintendo. They were both tales of failure and success of the human condition. I almost saw Atari and Nintendo like opposing warriors with the weapons of capitalism. Kent manages to weave this tale so well.

I really do wish someone would try to tackle it with a movie. Present Bushnell and Yamauchi as foils as both grew up in far from privileged backgrounds; Bushnell's father wasn't wealthy and Yamauchi's impressionable years were spent in factories during WWII and see the steps they took and how they went their different ways.

Anyways, random thoughts. What I also found interesting from the book that the idea of video games really was born in a club that envisioned a socialist utopia in which everyone shared. And that is what they did. One person made a game and someone in the same club would pick it up and add to it. It was this culture of sharing that you see still going on in the internet.

And it was also in part this culture of sharing or stealing as some saw it which almost caused video games to completely disappear from American markets.

PDF The Ultimate History of Video Games: From Pong to Pokemon--The Story Behind the Craze That

I also was vastly intrigued with how Americans do business versus the Japanese. The book is very dry at times, however. I found myself kind of bored over Sega and even playstation. What makes this book intriguing is we have an author who actually did decide to tackle the niche the history of video games and succeeds. May 09, Cheryl Kuhl-paine rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: This is an excellent book but it's far from an "ultimate history" of video games.

It was never intended to be such: A year History of Video Games". As the original title should indicate, the book focuses very heavily on industry side of things. It also starts its history with the coin-operated businesses of pinball and arcade machines.

The book roughly goes through a chronological account of maj This is an excellent book but it's far from an "ultimate history" of video games.

The book roughly goes through a chronological account of major goings-on. The establishment, rise, and fall of certain companies, like Atari, are documented in great detail, as are individual personalities who worked within these companies are also examined.

And, of course, plenty of anecdotes, quotes, and numbers are sprinkled throughout the book. All of this focuses almost exclusively on the U. Any asides to the Canadian, European, and Japanese markets are made solely for their relevance to the U. This was the only part of the book I was truly disappointed in.

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It certainly stands up as an examination of the U. For that matter, I'd love to read similar books that focus on non-U. Apr 01, Mikko Nieminen rated it it was ok. Good for some interesting quotes and anecdotes from industry veterans, and maybe as a historical reference on the business side of certain early US arcade and console game companies. As an "ultimate history of video games", I found this book to be severely lacking. While the book does painstakingly detail the business practices of certain industry pioneers down to each sales figure, advertising campaign and exact amounts of consoles manufactured per each holiday season, content on games themsel Good for some interesting quotes and anecdotes from industry veterans, and maybe as a historical reference on the business side of certain early US arcade and console game companies.

While the book does painstakingly detail the business practices of certain industry pioneers down to each sales figure, advertising campaign and exact amounts of consoles manufactured per each holiday season, content on games themselves, the game development process and the emerging of the entire culture surrounding video games was light, to say the least. Furthermore, the entire world of video games on home computers which, at least in Europe, was a way bigger phenomenon than consoles for the better part of the 80s and 90s was glossed over with a few mentions barely the size of a footnote.

The book even went to some length in presenting the dawn of IBM PC compatible gaming as some special leap in home computer gaming history, as if the prior generations never even happened. Add to this some minor but annoying factual errors popping up here and there, and I definitely can't provide an unconditional recommendation.

I hope someone will still come along and provide a more balanced and unbiased "ultimate history of video games" for us one day. Dec 17, Lisa rated it liked it Recommends it for: Maybe a 3.

This book contains a chronological history of video games starting with the Atari. The book was published in , so it ends with the original X Box. I also enjoyed reading about the games that I remembered. As a young adult I owned the first Atari, and bought several of the games. Unfortunately, this book is heavy on the consoles which I lost interest in after the Atari. That being said, my teenager and once teenagers loved consoles.

So I certainly knew most of the games and systems covered in the book.

Praise for The Ultimate History of Video Games

This is probably a book most people will not read every word of, but can be enjoyed more like a magazine. I did find the story of the risks, rewards, and busts to be very interesting. Some people made a little money, some lost their shirts, and a few made some big money. It is interesting to see what it took to be successful. View all 15 comments. GoodReads recommendation. Pretty good history of video games through The book is organized partly chronologically and partly topically.

There are also sections of direct quotes, often followed by text saying roughly the same thing. This organization lends itself to repetitiveness - the book could have been a bit shorter.

I enjoyed the combination of business history and product history. The major games along the way were described, so if you happened to have forgotten one, the description jogged the memory.

The ear Pretty good history of video games through The early part of the book focused on the beginnings of the industry and the stories were often personal - what a particular person did. There was less of that when covering the late 90s, I think in part because there was plentiful reference material from gaming magazines available to the author. By the end of the book, the personalities were secondary to the competitive production and sales numbers. This wasn't as interesting, but it surely reflects the growth of the industry.

A good read for video game enthusiasts. Chock full of information and history about a very fluid industry. At times, the information can be overwhelming but it is always engaging. Avid gamers who grew up during the early years of the home console market and the golden age of video arcades will find themselves smiling and laughing as they reminiscence. Readers expecting an in depth review or history regarding Pokemon may be slightly disappointed. Despite Pokemon in the title the author dedicated ve A good read for video game enthusiasts.

Despite Pokemon in the title the author dedicated very little time to the subject. Readers, without a doubt will walk away from this book with a deeper understanding of the video game industry and various tidbits of humorous and sometimes surprising information. Bottom line, it's worth your time and money.

Especially if you are a gaming enthusiast. May 31, Matthew Ciarvella rated it it was amazing Shelves: Although it's close to fifteen years old, I consider this book to be an absolute must-read for anyone who fancies him or herself a student of gamer culture and history.

It simply provides the sort of big picture look at the history of gaming that other books like "Masters of Doom" scratch at but cannot capture due to their more intimate focus. Furthermore, although it's a little amusing to read about the upcoming excitement promised by the PS2, GameCube, and Xbox original , the fact that this bo Although it's close to fifteen years old, I consider this book to be an absolute must-read for anyone who fancies him or herself a student of gamer culture and history.

Furthermore, although it's a little amusing to read about the upcoming excitement promised by the PS2, GameCube, and Xbox original , the fact that this book came out in means it's able to more clearly focus on the history of the 80s and 90s. A more recent book would be hard pressed to include quite so many details given the ever increasing length of time one needs to cover.

What I'd love to see is a second volume covering the most recent decade from this author.

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That would be a delightful read! Sin embargo, es un imprescindible. Nos presenta los inicios de la industria, empezando por los pinball. Los verdaderos padres de los videojuegos tienen su cabida en este libro para ser recordados, las grandes guerras de consolas, y los problemas legales entre empresas y contra los gobiernos.

Un punto de referencia para investigar cualquier tema. Feb 26, Logan rated it it was amazing. An excellent, excellent book. Kent interviewed lots of people and played games himself so he really captured the joy and feel of the industry. I appreciated that he covered lots of information from the game designers themselves, rather than focusing on company figureheads and CEOs. Interspersed throughout the book are quotations from game designers or key individuals that really made the history seem interesting and accurate.

The history starts with arcade machines, jukeboxes, and moves into the An excellent, excellent book. The history starts with arcade machines, jukeboxes, and moves into the first computer games and home consoles. It doesn't cover computer games as much more home consoles but it does a fairly comprehensive overview of console games, including consoles I'd never heard of.

I learned a lot and would consider this an excellent complement to David Sheff's "Game Over". Jan 21, Carolyn rated it liked it. I loved the personal stories of the creators and games. I most certainly remembered most of these games and that pleased me quite a bit. It is fun to reminisce about games your kids never knew existed. My kids find it fascinating when I tell them of taking my allowance in quarters and hanging out all day in the arcade. I wasn't all that interested in the many, well-researched details.

Guess I'm not that much of a computer nerd, but if you are, this is the I loved the personal stories of the creators and games. Guess I'm not that much of a computer nerd, but if you are, this is the book for you. Actually, the author should consider writing an updated version, because, as he mentions, this story really could just go on forever. Feb 08, Jeffrey rated it liked it Shelves: The first part of this book is nerd heaven - it presents a well-researched and fascinating story of the technological challenges and oversized personalities that drove the wild early years of video games.

But once it gets into the s, it starts to lose steam as it becomes more about the business side of the video game industry than about the games themselves. It does this well, but it gets uneven - certain companies and individuals get a lot more attention in the book than others, clearly bec The first part of this book is nerd heaven - it presents a well-researched and fascinating story of the technological challenges and oversized personalities that drove the wild early years of video games.

It does this well, but it gets uneven - certain companies and individuals get a lot more attention in the book than others, clearly because the author spent most of his time covering them as a reporter.

These weaknesses aside, the book is strongly recommended to those with an interest in the evolution of electronic games. Nov 29, Paul rated it it was amazing Shelves: This is like a more in-depth version of Console wars , but without the annoying literary device of narrative non-fiction.

Ultimate games of video the pdf history

It's exactly what I was looking for, highly recommended. The only problem with this book is even addressed by the author in the last chapter - it's not finished, because the history of video games is still happening. Here's hoping for a volume 2!

[PDF] Read The Ultimate History of Video Games by Steven L. Kent AudioBooks Read - buang2

Jun 17, rtxlib rated it really liked it Shelves: An interesting look at the development of the video game industry. The book is well documented with direct quotes from insiders throughout. I preferred the first half of the book mainly because I stopped playing video games in the early 90's.

Beyond that I just think the founding of nascent industries more interesting than the story of how established industries grow larger and larger. Anyway it was a good book.

I was engrossed completely when I read this behemoth of a book. I could not put it down and looked forward to every chance I had to re-discover the awesomeness and wonder of old school gaming. I plan on re-reading it again someday cause it's been quite a while since I read it and I think of it often. Totally enjoyable and fun. Jun 02, Eric Flapjack rated it it was amazing Shelves: Pretty thorough and fascinating book about the early days of video games.

The book covers the rise and fall of Atari, the great industry collapse, and eventual resurrection thanks to Nintendo.

The book is just over ten years old, so it ends with Sega and the last days of the Dreamcast. But make no mistake, there is a lot of information up until then. Highly recommended. Apr 21, David rated it it was amazing Shelves: Ends right before the launch of the Xbox and GameCube, but the early years are so detailed.

I started reading to recap the earlier years. I've seen numerous documentaries, but I was still able to take away some new gems from this read. Highly recommended for all fans. May 21, Benjamin Stein rated it it was amazing. Great read, especially for kids who were nerds in the 80s. Mar 07, Killerkobra rated it it was amazing.

Basically the bible of video games book. Turned me onto many other books which I felt was the greatest part. Also with the quotes from the actual people from the industry it made for a great read. I read every page of this book for my eighth grade research paper. It gives some very good information regarding the early and mid days of video games.

Used to also be titled "The First Quarter". There are no discussion topics on this book yet. Readers Also Enjoyed. About Steven L. Steven L. During that time, he worked as a Spanish-speaking missionary serving migrant farm workers in southern Idaho. He learned important lessons from working with farm laborers in Idaho. His years on the phone helped him develop an ear for dialog. A diehard Stephen King fan, Kent later admitted that he pitched the reviews to the Times so that he could afford to download the books.

Not only did this review land Kent three free PC games, it started him on a new career path. By the middle of , when Kent found himself laid off from his job at a PR agency, he became a full-time freelance journalist. In , Kent self-published The First Quarter: A year History of Video Games. During his career as a games journalist, Kent wrote the entries on video games for Encarta and the Encyclopedia Americana.

Books by Steven L. Trivia About The Ultimate Hist No trivia or quizzes yet. Quotes from The Ultimate Hist You could aim at targets now, rather than in the old days when you popped the ball up and just shook the shit out of the table and hoped that it went in the right hole or hit the right thing.

I'd also have liked more detail on the other companies involved in the early days of video games. My biggest complaint was how little Computer Gaming was covered. Sure the Apple II and Commodore 64 were mention. So was Doom.

He made brief mention of how some third party publishers were focusing on Computer Games, but mostly as part of the story of how they were lured to make console games.

Blizzard wasn't mentioned at all. Apart from the mention of Doom, id was ignored. Sierra Online, who was a huge part of my childhood barely got mentioned. My final complaint is this book relied too heavily on quotes. It's hard to say for sure since I did audio, but it felt like half of each chapter was simply quotes of people in the industry. I don't really need quotes. I need the author to interview and research and present a narrative to me.

The occasional quote to drive a point is fine. All that said, I enjoyed this book. I've read a lot of books on early computers and a few things on video games in particular and this book covers a good range of detail from the s until the late 90s. If you're particularly interested in American Console game video game history, this is a good choice. However it's far from the Ultimate history simply because too many things I feel were important to the rise of video games in not only the United States, but the entire world were badly neglected.

Steven Kent succeeds in making a highly accessible and informative story keeping a healthy sense of humor along the way. It would have been so easy, so very very easy, to write an esoteric history of video games.

I'm a fan of games myself, but their seems to be this strange elitism about the gaming community that writers have. Gaming magazines and Absolutely fantastic book about, big surprise, the history of video games that starts with playing cards and ends with the death of the Sega Dreamcast.

Gaming magazines and websites even reviews on YouTube have a tendency towards arrogance - bordering on being obnoxious - about the world of video games. The message feels like, "You're either in this world or you have no chance in getting into it.