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THE NEW POSITIONING JACK TROUT PDF

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Book Title: The New Positioning: The Latest on the World's #1 Business. Strategy. Author: Jack Trout (with Steve Rivkin). Reviewed by Lau Swee Ting. Back in , Jack Trout answered the question, and that is the results He authored and co-authored 15 books, including Positioning, The New Positioning. FabCom. BRAND POSITIONING IS IN YOUR HEAD began in the spring of when Jack Trout and strategy and tactics for positioning a product into one.


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Whats new in "The New Positioning'. Jack Trout updates and adds to a concept that he first wrote about in It comes in three parts. Part One presents new. You taste what you expect to taste. E.g. New Coke, a major. marketing disaster. F olly by company to improve on the taste of. the real thing. Access a free summary of The New Positioning, by Steve Rivkin and Jack Trout and other business, leadership and nonfiction books on getAbstract.

Human brain can only deal with a maximum of seven things at a time, so make sure that your product or service is one of a very few items that are being considered 2. Message must be of inherent natural interest to the individual you are appealing to, otherwise you won't be remembered and hence will have no position 3. Because memory is closely associated with the limbic system, the seat of the brain's emotions, messages learned when the emotions are running high are better remembered than messages learned when emotions are 'flat' 4. The brain only learns something new if it can somehow be related to something it already knows the process known as apperception In the chapter entitled 'minds hate confusion' the authors entreat us to keep marketing and positioning concepts and messages simple, and to focus on the major differentiating strength of the product or service. Anything that requires a complex analysis to prove should be forgotten. Anything that doesn't fit with brands perceptions should be avoided. Finally, never ignore the obvious.

Obvious ideas tend to be the most powerful ideas, because they'll be obvious to the market as well. They cite the 'principle of.

Hence testimonials generally work well. Also the bandwagon effect "in eight out of the last ten years, product x has won the best in its class award" is a proven old chestnut.

And Trout also advises that for companies with long histories, this be mentioned as proof that they are solid and reliable.

In the section entitled 'minds don't change' the authors describe how difficult it is to change the image of a product or service one it has been formed they actually trot out the old phrase about 'never having a second chance to make a first impression' in making the point.

Positioning: The Battle for Your Mind

It is probably easier to re-invent the image with a whole new name and concept, rather than try to reposition the existing one. And they also point out that many marketing and advertising campaigns in recent years have drifted away from the product's first image, as new marketing and advertising hotshots try to do something more creative with it.

Several of these companies they cite Brylcreem, Timex, Kentucky Fried Chicken and several others have gone back to their original image, as a better positioning strategy. Finally, the authors caution that 'minds can lose focus', and warn against, in particular, what they call the 'line extension trap'.

Positioning the trout pdf jack new

They quote from a Harvard Business Review article: Armed with this marketer's understanding of how the mind works they then present several 'tricks of the trade', which are best thought of as pointers to keep in mind when designing a marketing or advertising campaign. These are: How to find a good name for a product or service make it short; make it pleasantsounding; make it memorable 2. If you can, create and name a new product or service category by re-conceptualizing the benefits of the product , which if you can, then of course, be first in and reap all the benefits of having the initial position 3.

Beware of research especially focus groups, which can generate some useful information, but should not be considered to be a representative sample 4. Similarly, beware of overly-zealous public relations activities - PR activities have their place at the initial stages of a marketing campaign when the primary mandate is to generate some interest and awareness - advertising initiatives then can build on this Further, Trout and Rivkin offer their observations to avoid what they call 6 marketing pitfalls: Don't avoid the obvious - embrace the 'self-evident' attributes of a product or service as these are more likely to be the ones to capture the public's imagination.

Don't get caught up in planning obsessively for the future - focus on today's opportunities and challenges 3. Do avoid what they term 'the cutesy factor' - the temptation to be cute or clever in messages and advertising - this may make for entertaining copy, but it won't necessarily sell product.

Beware the hero that is, any new marketing person who feels a need to shake up things simply for the sake of change 5.

Don't be too focused on the short term only - positioning is a long-term process in order to build the proper image and identity - initiatives that are focused on delivering short-term results only may actually the hamper the effectiveness of a longer-term strategy 6. Finally, avoid tinkering with a strategy that is producing results see number 4, above In the middle part of the book, the authors present several case studies of repositioning certain products, businesses and industries.

These include a software company, an ice cream company, an accounting firm, political candidates, a television show, and an oil company. Each case study is given a chapter in the book, which documents the background situation and then is discussed in terms of positioning strategies possible.

Talks about branding and rebranding in customer's mind. Finally, never ignore the obvious.

New Positioning by Jack Trout & Steve Rivkin

Obvious ideas tend to be the most powerful ideas, because they'll be obvious to the market as well. They cite the 'principle of social proof', which states that we determine what is correct by finding out what other people think is correct also known as the 'herd mentality'. Hence testimonials generally work well. Also the bandwagon effect "in eight out of the last ten years, product x has won the best in its class award" is a proven old chestnut.

And Trout also advises that for companies with long histories, this be mentioned as proof that they are solid and reliable. In the section entitled 'minds don't change' the authors describe how difficult it is to change the image of a product or service one it has been formed they actually trot out the old phrase about 'never having a second chance to make a first impression' in making the point.

Jack Trout

It is probably easier to re-invent the image with a whole new name and concept, rather than try to reposition the existing one.

And they also point out that many marketing and advertising campaigns in recent years have drifted away from the product's first image, as new marketing and advertising hotshots try to do something more creative with it.

Positioning the jack pdf new trout

Several of these companies they cite Brylcreem, Timex, Kentucky Fried Chicken and several others have gone back to their original image, as a better positioning strategy. Finally, the authors caution that 'minds can lose focus', and warn against, in particular, what they call the 'line extension trap'. You need to understand how the human mind works to position your brand effectively, since positioning is not based on "what you do to the product," but on "what you do to the mind.

Jack Trout - Wikipedia

You can position it more strategically if you understand how the mind works. Today, people are overwhelmed with so much information that it is especially critical to know how to reach their minds. When consumers have too much information, problem solving is more difficult.

If they have a surfeit of facts to analyze, they end up thinking and understanding less and less. Thus, you need to break through this modern disease of mental "clutter," where you are drowning in information, unnecessary words, statistics and jargon. With this onslaught, people block out information as a form of self-defense.

To penetrate such barriers and become more effective at getting response to your product, consider these five keys to understanding the way the mind works.

Pdf jack the positioning new trout