tvnovellas.info Theory QUICK PRIMER FOR OLD SCHOOL GAMING PDF

QUICK PRIMER FOR OLD SCHOOL GAMING PDF

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Shortly thereafter, he released A Quick Primer for Old School Gaming, a page PDF that is supposed to serve as introduction to "old-school. "A quick introduction to playing Original D&D or Swords & Wizardry (the 0e A Quick Primer for Old School Gaming () German PDF. This product is available as a free PDF download from tvnovellas.info Matthew Finch's A Quick Primer for Old School Gaming is available as a.


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This booklet is an introduction to “old school” gaming, designed especially for Most of the time in old-style gaming, you don't use a rule; you make a ruling. A Quick Primer to Old Skool tvnovellas.info - Download as PDF File .pdf), Text File ( .txt) or read online. This isn't done to make modern-style gaming look bad: we assume most people reading this booklet regularly play modern-style games and.

Copyright , Matthew J. This booklet is an introduction to old school gaming, designed especially for anyone who started playing fantasy role-playing games after, say, the year but its also for longer-time players who have slowly shifted over to modern styles of role-playing over the years. What makes 0e different from later games isnt the rules themselves, its how theyre used. In fact, theres such a big difference between the 0e style of play and the modern style of play that Ive described four Zen Moments where a fundamental modern gaming concept is turned completely on its head by the 0e approach. These are areas where your most basic assumptions about gaming probably need to be reversed, if you want to experience what real 0e playing is all about.

It's great fun.

A Quick Primer for Old School Gaming | Role Playing Games | Dungeons & Dragons

But lately I noticed there was something missing. I couldn't quite put my finger on it. Finch writes a concise and illuminating treatise on the benefits and drawbacks to the different styles of gaming. He offers a number of humorous scripts as comparison between the old and new camps and presents his four "Zen Moments" where original RPGs differ most drastically from their modern counterparts. Tactics and rules are fun and I love 4E's combat rules, but I found that I missed the interactivity.

Instead of rolling a die to search for traps or treasure, I missed describing dungeon chambers in detail to my players and having them describe right back how their characters were searching. I missed derring-do in combat instead of the tedium of back-and-forth number crunching.

Modern roleplaying games like 4E aren't old school, at least by Finch's definition, but they are malleable. Just knowing what you're missing, what you're looking to get out of a game, can help you relive those glory days. Back when you never dreamed of calculating encumbrance and the DM's rule was law, before a number on a character sheet replaced a well-aimed poke with a ten foot pole.

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Finch's primer can help you find what you might have lost. View Comments. Is it unfair? They roll to hit.

I roll to hit. Good rolls might get good consequences, such as disarming the foe, making him fall, smashing him against a wall for extra damage, pushing him backward, etc. Again, make it up on the spot. Remember the Ming Vase! They have to think. Compare these two examples of exploring a room where a secret compartment is hidden behind a moose head on the wall.

School quick primer for gaming pdf old

Anything in the room? Over time, more and more detail was put into combat rules; and die rolls replaced the part of the game that focused on mapping, noticing details, experimentation, and deduction. I roll a d In these games, a player can describe and attempt virtually anything he can think of. He can try to slide on the ground between opponents, swing from a chandelier and chop at a distant foe, taunt an opponent into running over a pit trap … whatever he wants to try.

Primer school gaming for pdf quick old

Your sword goes flying. You trip and fall. Your sword sticks into a crack in the floor. You spin around and gain an extra attack. You slay the orc, kick his body off your sword, and blood spatters into the eyes of one of the orcs behind him.

A Quick Primer for Old School Gaming

Each result is different, and none of them were official — you just made them up out of nowhere. A character leaps onto a table, but the table breaks. Swinging into combat on a rope succeeds — but the rope breaks and the character ends up swinging into the wrong group of monsters.

A hit by a monster causes one of the characters to drop a torch. All these little details add to the quality of old-style combat, and change it dramatically from a sequence of d20 rolls into something far more alive and exciting.

So why even have it? Because every quick, less-significant combat uses up resources. And when I say quick, I mean very, very quick. In modern games, where combat contains special moves and lots of rules, combat takes up lots of time. In older rules, a small combat can take five minutes or less. So small combats work very well as a way of depleting those precious resources in a race against time. This is also, by the way, why older- style games award experience points for gaining treasure as well as for killing monsters.

The theory is that no one wants to spend time keeping track of mundane things like torches and food. In fact, I would have called this a fifth Zen moment of realization except that resource management is still a factor in later games — just to a lesser degree.

In lower level adventures, food and light sources can be the key to success or failure of an expedition remember, 0e is about the little guy. First, you have to keep track of time in the dungeon so that you can quickly tell the players what resources to mark off their character sheets. If you lose track of game time, you lose quality in the game. Second, there has to be a meaningful choice for the players between pressing forward or retreating from the dungeon. There is, however, no rule covering the chance of some random event that might affect the priceless Ming Vase.

A sword goes flying — the table underneath the vase is hit by the sword — the vase is swaying back and forth, ready to topple — can anyone catch it, perhaps making a long dive-and-slide across the floor? Is it unfair?

A Quick Primer to Old Skool Gaming.pdf

They roll to hit. I roll to hit. In combat, bad rolls can spontaneously generate bad consequences make sure you do this to both sides, not just the players.

Good rolls might get good consequences, such as disarming the foe, making him fall, smashing him against a wall for extra damage, pushing him backward, etc. Again, make it up on the spot. Remember the Ming Vase! They have to think. Compare these two examples of exploring a room where a secret compartment is hidden behind a moose head on the wall. Anything in the room? You might be saying to yourself: Over time, more and more detail was put into combat rules; and die rolls replaced the part of the game that focused on mapping, noticing details, experimentation, and deduction.

I roll a d In these games, a player can describe and attempt virtually anything he can think of.

He can try to slide on the ground between opponents, swing from a chandelier and chop at a distant foe, taunt an opponent into running over a pit trap … whatever he wants to try. Your sword goes flying. You trip and fall. Your sword sticks into a crack in the floor. You spin around and gain an extra attack. You slay the orc, kick his body off your sword, and blood spatters into the eyes of one of the orcs behind him. Each result is different, and none of them were official — you just made them up out of nowhere.

A character leaps onto a table, but the table breaks. Swinging into combat on a rope succeeds — but the rope breaks and the character ends up swinging into the wrong group of monsters.

A hit by a monster causes one of the characters to drop a torch. All these little details add to the quality of old-style combat, and change it dramatically from a sequence of d20 rolls into something far more alive and exciting. So why even have it? Because every quick, less-significant combat uses up resources. And when I say quick, I mean very, very quick.

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In modern games, where combat contains special moves and lots of rules, combat takes up lots of time. In older rules, a small combat can take five minutes or less. So small combats work very well as a way of depleting those precious resources in a race against time. This is also, by the way, why older- style games award experience points for gaining treasure as well as for killing monsters. The theory is that no one wants to spend time keeping track of mundane things like torches and food.

However, one thing you have to realize about 0e: In fact, I would have called this a fifth Zen moment of realization except that resource management is still a factor in later games — just to a lesser degree. In lower level adventures, food and light sources can be the key to success or failure of an expedition remember, 0e is about the little guy.

A Quick Primer for Old School Gaming (PDF)

First, you have to keep track of time in the dungeon so that you can quickly tell the players what resources to mark off their character sheets. If you lose track of game time, you lose quality in the game.

Second, there has to be a meaningful choice for the players between pressing forward or retreating from the dungeon. Pressing forward with low resources is obviously risky, and there should be an incentive to keep going without just going back to memorize spells and heal up for a second try.

Pdf old primer school quick for gaming

These incentives and disincentives might include the following 1 high cost of living in an inn, 2 a reward from the local baron for completing a particular mission quickly the reward declines per day , 3 a prisoner might be killed — and the kidnappers might even have given a deadline for this, 4 the way back has become blocked by a monster, trap, or portcullis, and another way out must be found, 5 the party is lost due to a teleportation trap or bad mapping, 6 the treasure the party seeks is being destroyed or consumed with time, 7 the party has been told not to come back out until some mission is finished — always a good trick when the party has legal troubles, 8 a wager or other social situation means that the party will lose money or be generally ridiculed if they return without a certain amount of treasure, or 9 the party has to pay a fee each time they enter the dungeon.

Final reminders: You are the rulebook. There is no other rulebook. Make it fast, make it colorful, and make it full of decisions for the players. How to Get Started Step 1: Read the Zen moments.

Step 2: