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SHORTHAND SPEED BOOK

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containing the book RE-1 + shorthand dictation audio recordings of all the exercises; useful for practice at convenience and gain speed writing in shorthand . What is understood when we talk about "shorthand speed” is how many words per minute his book "Literacy and Reading", "we read at a normal speed of. PDF Drive is your search engine for PDF files. As of today we have 78,, eBooks for you to download for free. No annoying ads, no download limits, enjoy .


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Find Book. LESSON LESSON-1A. LESSON-1B. Lesson-1C. LESSON LESSON Lesson LESSON LESSON LESSON LESSON LESSON- 9. Read WPM SHORTHAND SPEED PRACTICE PASSAGES APGTE book reviews & author details and more at tvnovellas.info Free delivery on qualified orders. A workable speed for PA/secretary is 80wpm; A workable minimum for , according to the Guinness Book of Records; Great speed for PAs: anything over.

Having taken and passed Gregg Shorthand in the equivalent of eighth grade I am of the opinion that this honor should have been marked Instructor Required. As such, I'm leaving this as zero percent complete because in my opinion, it is only teachable by a versed instructor. I wouldn't change anything below. There are many forms of shorthand, but the one most commonly used in the United States is Gregg Shorthand. This section presents the Century Edition.

Phrasing should be indulged in sparingly on unfamiliar matter. But on familiar matter the student should always be alert for opportunities of saving both time and effort by employing the principles of intersection, elimination of consonants and the joining of words of frequent occurrence. Nothing less than absolute accuracy should satisfy the student.

Conflicting outlines should be carefully distinguished. Where words may be distinguished either by the insertion of vowels or the changing of one of the outlines, the latter should always be the method employed; vowels should freely be inserted whenever possible.

The sense of the matter should be carefully preserved by the punctuation of the notes, indicating the full stop and leaving spaces in the notes between phrases. The best matter of the for the student beginning practice for speed is to be found in the dictation books compiled by the publishers of the system. At first, the dictation should be slow to permit the making of careful outlines.

Gradually the speed should be increased until the student is obliged to exert himself to keep pace with the reader; and occasionally short bursts of speed should be attempted as tests of the writer's progress. The student ambitious to succeed will endeavor to familiarize himself with all matters pertaining to stenography. By reading the shorthand magazines he will keep himself in touch with the latest developments in the art. Facility in reading shorthand will also be acquired by reading the shorthand plates in these magazines.

For comparison and suggestion, he will study the facsimile notes of practical stenographers. He will neglect no opportunity to improve himself in the use of his art. And finally he will join a shorthand society where he will come in contact with other stenographers who are striving toward the same goal as himself. Despite being years old Pitman's shorthand is still relevant today and used by thousands of journalists, executive PAs and secretaries across the world.

In Europe, particularly in Great Britain there are thousands of educational institutions teaching Pitman's shorthand. In the United States and some other parts of the world it has been largely superseded by Gregg shorthand , which was first published in by John Robert Gregg. This system was influenced by the handwriting shapes that Gabelsberger had introduced.

Expert shorthand speed course: Clyde Insley Blanchard: tvnovellas.info: Books

Gregg's shorthand, like Pitman's, is phonetic, but has the simplicity of being "light-line. In fact, Gregg claimed joint authorship in another shorthand system published in pamphlet form by one Thomas Stratford Malone; Malone, however, claimed sole authorship and a legal battle ensued.

For instance, on page 10 of the manual is the word d i m 'dim'; however, in the Gregg system the spelling would actually mean n u k or 'nook'. Our Japanese pen shorthand began in , transplanted from the American Pitman-Graham system. Geometric theory has great influence in Japan. But Japanese motions of writing gave some influence to our shorthand. We are proud to have reached the highest speed in capturing spoken words with a pen. Major pen shorthand systems are Shuugiin, Sangiin, Nakane and Waseda [a repeated vowel shown here means a vowel spoken in double-length in Japanese, sometimes shown instead as a bar over the vowel].

Including a machine-shorthand system, Sokutaipu, we have 5 major shorthand systems now. The Japan Shorthand Association now has 1, members. There are several other pen shorthands in use Ishimura, Iwamura, Kumassaki, Kotani, and Nissokuken , leading to a total of nine pen shorthands in use.

In addition, there is the Yamane pen shorthand of unknown importance and three machine shorthands systems Speed Waapuro, Caver and Hayatokun or sokutaipu. The machine shorthands have gained some ascendancy over the pen shorthands. Japanese shorthand systems 'sokki' shorthand or 'sokkidou' stenography commonly use a syllabic approach, much like the common writing system for Japanese which has actually two syllabaries in everyday use. There are several semi-cursive systems. The two Japanese syllabaries are themselves adapted from the Chinese characters both of the syllabaries, katakana and hiragana, are in everyday use alongside the Chinese characters known as kanji; the kanji, being developed in parallel to the Chinese characters, have their own idiosyncrasies, but Chinese and Japanese ideograms are largely comprehensible, even if their use in the languages are not the same.

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Prior to the Meiji era, Japanese did not have its own shorthand the kanji did have their own abbreviated forms borrowed alongside them from China. Takusari Kooki was the first to give classes in a new Western-style non-ideographic shorthand of his own design, emphasis being on the non-ideographic and new. This was the first shorthand system adapted to writing phonetic Japanese, all other systems prior being based on the idea of whole or partial semantic ideographic writing like that used in the Chinese characters, and the phonetic approach being mostly peripheral to writing in general.

Book shorthand speed

Even today, Japanese writing uses the syllabaries to pronounce or spell out words, or to indicate grammatical words. Furigana are written alongside kanji, or Chinese characters, to indicate their pronunciation especially in juvenile publications.

Furigana are usually written using the hiragana syllabary; foreign words may not have a kanji form and are spelled out using katakana. The new sokki were used to transliterate popular vernacular story-telling theater yose of the day. This led to a thriving industry of sokkibon shorthand books. The ready availability of the stories in book form, and higher rates of literacy which the very industry of sokkibon may have helped create, due to these being oral classics that were already known to most people may also have helped kill the yose theater, as people no longer needed to see the stories performed in person to enjoy them.

Sokkibon also allowed a whole host of what had previously been mostly oral rhetorical and narrative techniques into writing, such as imitation of dialect in conversations which can be found back in older gensaku literature; but gensaku literature used conventional written language in between conversations, however. Shorthands that use simplified letterforms are sometimes termed stenographic shorthands, contrasting with alphabetic shorthands, below.

Stenographic shorthands can be further differentiated by the target letter forms as geometric, script, and semi-script or elliptical.

Geometric shorthands are based on circles, parts of circles, and straight lines placed strictly horizontally, vertically or diagonally. The first modern shorthand systems were geometric.

Script shorthands are based on the motions of ordinary handwriting. The first system of this type was published under the title Cadmus Britanicus by Simon Bordley, in However, the first practical system was the German Gabelsberger shorthand of This class of system is now common in all more recent German shorthand systems, as well as in Austria, Italy, Scandinavia, the Netherlands, Russia, other Eastern European countries, and elsewhere.

Script-geometric , or semi-script , shorthands are based on the ellipse. Semi-script can be considered a compromise between the geometric systems and the script systems.

However, the most successful system of this type was Gregg shorthand , introduced by John Robert Gregg in Gregg had studied not only the geometric English systems, but also the German Stolze stenography, a script shorthand.

The semi-script philosophy gained popularity in Italy in the first half of the 20th century with three different systems created by Giovanni Vincenzo Cima, Erminio Meschini, and Stenital Mosciaro. Some shorthand systems attempted to ease learning by using characters from the Latin alphabet. Such non-stenographic systems have often been described as alphabetic , and purists might claim that such systems are not 'true' shorthand.

However, these alphabetic systems do have value for students who cannot dedicate the years necessary to master a stenographic shorthand. Alphabetic shorthands cannot be written at the speeds theoretically possible with symbol systems— words per minute or more—but require only a fraction of the time to acquire a useful speed of between 60 and words per minute.

Non-stenographic systems often supplement alphabetic characters by using punctuation marks as additional characters, giving special significance to capitalised letters, and sometimes using additional non-alphabetic symbols. Examples of such systems include Stenoscript , Speedwriting and Forkner shorthand.

However, there are some pure alphabetic systems, including Personal Shorthand , SuperWrite , Easy Script Speed Writing, and Keyscript Shorthand which limit their symbols to a priori alphabetic characters. These have the added advantage that they can also be typed—for instance, onto a computer , PDA , or cellphone. Early editions of Speedwriting were also adapted so that they could be written on a typewriter, and therefore would possess the same advantage. Traditional shorthand systems are written on paper with a stenographic pencil or a stenographic pen.

Phonetic shorthand speed-book

Some consider that strictly speaking only handwritten systems can be called shorthand. Machine shorthand is also a common term for writing produced by a stenotype , a specialized keyboard.

These are often used for court room transcripts and in live subtitling. However, there are other shorthand machines used worldwide, including: One of the most widely used forms of shorthand is still the Pitman shorthand method described above, which has been adapted for 15 languages. In the UK, the spelling-based rather than phonetic Teeline shorthand is now more commonly taught and used than Pitman, and Teeline is the recommended system of the National Council for the Training of Journalists with an overall speed of words per minute necessary for certification.

Phonetic Shorthand Speed-Book (Classic Reprint) by William W. Osgoodby (2015, Paperback)

Teeline is also the most common shorthand method taught to New Zealand journalists, whose certification typically requires a shorthand speed of at least 80 words per minute. In Nigeria, shorthand is still taught in higher institutions of learning, especially for students studying Office Technology Management and Business Education. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Speed book shorthand

For the process of concealing information in messages, see steganography. For machine stenography, see stenotype. See also: Cursive script East Asia. This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. September Learn how and when to remove this template message. Pitman's system uses a phonemic orthography. For this reason, it is sometimes known as phonography, meaning "sound writing" in Greek.

One of the reasons this system allows fast transcription is that vowel sounds are optional when only consonants are needed to determine a word. The availability of a full range of vowel symbols, however, makes complete accuracy possible. Isaac's brother Benn Pitman, who lived in Cincinnati , Ohio , was responsible for introducing the method to America.

The record for fast writing with Pitman shorthand is wpm during a two-minute test by Nathan Behrin in Not until the ability to write shorthand without mental hesitation has been acquired, should speed practice begin. A student observing the note-taking of an experienced stenographer will be struck with admiration at the smoothness of the writing and the perfect regularity of the outlines. An excellent method of practice for the like facility is in the copying of a selection sentence by sentence until the whole is memorized, and then writing it over and over again.

All notes taken at any speed should strictly be compared with the printed matter. It will then be found that many words are taken for others because of the forms they assume when written under pressure. Most of these can be avoided by careful attention to the writing.

Experience alone will authorize any deviation from the text-book forms.

Phonetic shorthand speed-book

Phrasing should be indulged in sparingly on unfamiliar matter. But on familiar matter the student should always be alert for opportunities of saving both time and effort by employing the principles of intersection, elimination of consonants and the joining of words of frequent occurrence.

Nothing less than absolute accuracy should satisfy the student. Conflicting outlines should be carefully distinguished. Where words may be distinguished either by the insertion of vowels or the changing of one of the outlines, the latter should always be the method employed; vowels should freely be inserted whenever possible. The sense of the matter should be carefully preserved by the punctuation of the notes, indicating the full stop and leaving spaces in the notes between phrases.

The best matter of the for the student beginning practice for speed is to be found in the dictation books compiled by the publishers of the system. At first, the dictation should be slow to permit the making of careful outlines.

Gradually the speed should be increased until the student is obliged to exert himself to keep pace with the reader; and occasionally short bursts of speed should be attempted as tests of the writer's progress. The student ambitious to succeed will endeavor to familiarize himself with all matters pertaining to stenography.

By reading the shorthand magazines he will keep himself in touch with the latest developments in the art. Facility in reading shorthand will also be acquired by reading the shorthand plates in these magazines. For comparison and suggestion, he will study the facsimile notes of practical stenographers. He will neglect no opportunity to improve himself in the use of his art.

And finally he will join a shorthand society where he will come in contact with other stenographers who are striving toward the same goal as himself. In Europe, particularly in Great Britain there are thousands of educational institutions teaching Pitman's shorthand. In the United States and some other parts of the world it has been largely superseded by Gregg shorthand , which was first published in by John Robert Gregg.

This system was influenced by the handwriting shapes that Gabelsberger had introduced. Gregg's shorthand, like Pitman's, is phonetic, but has the simplicity of being "light-line. In fact, Gregg claimed joint authorship in another shorthand system published in pamphlet form by one Thomas Stratford Malone; Malone, however, claimed sole authorship and a legal battle ensued. For instance, on page 10 of the manual is the word d i m 'dim'; however, in the Gregg system the spelling would actually mean n u k or 'nook'.

Geometric theory has great influence in Japan. But Japanese motions of writing gave some influence to our shorthand. We are proud to have reached the highest speed in capturing spoken words with a pen. Major pen shorthand systems are Shuugiin, Sangiin, Nakane and Waseda [a repeated vowel shown here means a vowel spoken in double-length in Japanese, sometimes shown instead as a bar over the vowel].

Including a machine-shorthand system, Sokutaipu, we have 5 major shorthand systems now. The Japan Shorthand Association now has 1, members.

In addition, there is the Yamane pen shorthand of unknown importance and three machine shorthands systems Speed Waapuro, Caver and Hayatokun or sokutaipu. The machine shorthands have gained some ascendancy over the pen shorthands. There are several semi-cursive systems. The two Japanese syllabaries are themselves adapted from the Chinese characters both of the syllabaries, katakana and hiragana, are in everyday use alongside the Chinese characters known as kanji; the kanji, being developed in parallel to the Chinese characters, have their own idiosyncrasies, but Chinese and Japanese ideograms are largely comprehensible, even if their use in the languages are not the same.

Prior to the Meiji era, Japanese did not have its own shorthand the kanji did have their own abbreviated forms borrowed alongside them from China. Takusari Kooki was the first to give classes in a new Western-style non-ideographic shorthand of his own design, emphasis being on the non-ideographic and new.

This was the first shorthand system adapted to writing phonetic Japanese, all other systems prior being based on the idea of whole or partial semantic ideographic writing like that used in the Chinese characters, and the phonetic approach being mostly peripheral to writing in general. Even today, Japanese writing uses the syllabaries to pronounce or spell out words, or to indicate grammatical words. Furigana are written alongside kanji, or Chinese characters, to indicate their pronunciation especially in juvenile publications.

Furigana are usually written using the hiragana syllabary; foreign words may not have a kanji form and are spelled out using katakana. This led to a thriving industry of sokkibon shorthand books.

The ready availability of the stories in book form, and higher rates of literacy which the very industry of sokkibon may have helped create, due to these being oral classics that were already known to most people may also have helped kill the yose theater, as people no longer needed to see the stories performed in person to enjoy them. Sokkibon also allowed a whole host of what had previously been mostly oral rhetorical and narrative techniques into writing, such as imitation of dialect in conversations which can be found back in older gensaku literature; but gensaku literature used conventional written language in between conversations, however.

Stenographic shorthands can be further differentiated by the target letter forms as geometric, script, and semi-script or elliptical. Geometric shorthands are based on circles, parts of circles, and straight lines placed strictly horizontally, vertically or diagonally. The first modern shorthand systems were geometric.

The first system of this type was published under the title Cadmus Britanicus by Simon Bordley, in However, the first practical system was the German Gabelsberger shorthand of This class of system is now common in all more recent German shorthand systems, as well as in Austria, Italy, Scandinavia, the Netherlands, Russia, other Eastern European countries, and elsewhere.

Script-geometric, or semi-script, shorthands are based on the ellipse. Semi-script can be considered a compromise between the geometric systems and the script systems. However, the most successful system of this type was Gregg shorthand , introduced by John Robert Gregg in Gregg had studied not only the geometric English systems, but also the German Stolze stenography, a script shorthand. The semi-script philosophy gained popularity in Italy in the first half of the 20th century with three different systems created by Giovanni Vincenzo Cima, Erminio Meschini, and Stenital Mosciaro.